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WWD - Morrison Formation by randomdinos WWD - Morrison Formation by randomdinos
Late Jurassic, Colorado (mild reference to a failed story there...). Oh boy, this is the longest description I've ever written... dammit Morrison, why must you have such diverse and amazing fauna!
I do not own the references used for any of the animals; they belong to GSP (Allosaurus, Dryosaurus), the Tree of Life project (Gargoyleosaurus; based after Mymoorapelta), SVPOW (Brachiosaurus) and Scott Hartman (everything else).

Left to right:
Gargoyleosaurus parkpinorum: One of the first ankylosaurs, this 3.5 meter polacanthine is a shy generalistic omnivore that lives among deep foliage in the conifer forests. While its armor is not enough to defend it from the larger Morrison predators, one individual fends off a Marshosaurus and momentarily startles the juvenile Supersaurus when they encounter it, but promptly returns to eating.
Brontosaurus excelsus: Because nobody has yet featured #BRONTOSMASH , this 20.5 meter apatosaurine would be here to do just that. Two males are portrayed fighting for mating rights, one of which falls over and is severely crippled. The rest of the herd eventually abandons the wounded male, and as night falls, the Allosaurus close in.
Stegosaurus stenops: Everyone's favorite 7.7 meter stegosaur features here as usual. Instead of being socially intolerant like the original, this herbivore prefers to live in non-obligate symbiosis with Camptosaurus, providing protection from predators while being rewarded with an early warning of danger. Fends off multiple attacks, but one individual is killed by the Torvosaurus.
Allosaurus fragilis: For once allosaurs won't rule the Morrison, but this 8.5 meter predator (they can get much larger, but rarely ever reach skeletal maturity) is still pretty respectable. Like the Coelophysis from the first episode, they live in disorganized gangs that either split off to hunt for themselves or mob wounded larger game. Three individuals try to hunt down a Camptosaurus in a mixed herd, but fail; a larger mob finishes off the crippled male Brontosaurus.
Harpactognathus gentryii: With a 2.5 meter wingspan, this fairly large rhamphorhynchid would be the biggest predator in the skies, feeding on fish, baby dinosaurs, other pterosaurs and avialans. They're the worst nightmare of a hatchling sauropod, but also the quickest carnivore to cease being a threat as the Supersaurus age.
Camptosaurus dispar: Lacking the speed and agility of its smaller relatives and the impressive attributes of the stegosaurs or sauropods, this 7-meter herbivore would arguably be rather boring if not for its (speculative) symbiosis with Stegosaurus. The gnarly armored neighbors save many a camptosaur from Allosaurus and other giant predators, but the ornithopods are more than capable of defending themselves against smaller foes.
Supersaurus vivianae: Giant diplodocids, how can they not be appealing? This 33.7 meter behemoth is, in a way, the replacement for the original Diplodocus (my intention was to use Barosaurus, but given that we don't know how big the BYU specimens really are, it was scrapped in fear of making a similar mistake to BBC's 42m Diplodocus). It has a smaller role, though, as to give space to the other species. Juveniles hide in the depths of conifer forests and are preyed upon by Marshosaurus and Harpactognathus until they get big enough to join the herd in the open fern prairies.
Marshosaurus bicentesimus: This 4.4 meter megalosaur is another main threat for the juvenile sauropods (and the Harpactognathus itself). Mostly hidden in foliage or shadow, it's highly elusive and avoids the edge of the forests just as much as the baby Supersaurus do, for there's plenty of things in the plains that could take it down.
Camarasaurus lentus: The most common of Morrison sauropods, this 13.8 meter macronarian makes a brief appearance as the first animal the juvenile Supersaurus encounter as they leave the forests, with a small herd feeding on sparse vegetation within a wide canyon.
Brachiosaurus sp.: With all the upsizings certain diplodocids have gotten recently, the Morrison brachiosaurs just aren't the giants they used to be, right? Wrong. At 29 meters, this brachiosaurid looks down upon every other creature in the area, and after its day, few would grow taller. While the original gives us a short feeling of awe and wonder by showing the Brachiosaurus towering over juvenile diplodocids, this would take it a level of magnitude further by portraying an entire herd of them a la GSP Giraffatitan piece. (NOTE: The one seen here is oversized, the likely length of Potter Creek's Brachiosaurus sp is roughly 26 meters instead of 29 - still massive though).
Torvosaurus tanneri: While commonly believed to stand in the shadow of large allosauroids, this predator that, based on the ''Edmarka rex'' material, could reach over 11.8 meters in length is here portrayed as the largest predator of the Morrison, taking down healthy subadult stegosaurs. An adult arrives the day after the Brontosaurus's death, when most of the allosaur mob has already gorged themselves in flesh. The remaining Allosaurus question the megalosaur's authority over the kill, but are quickly sent away.
Dryosaurus altus: Background species. Runs around and stuff.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Edited Feb 23, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Supersaurus eh...Supersaurus, Torvosaurus...I have a feeling much of this is from Dry Mesa, Bone Cabin and a few related formations? Pity Carnegie Quarry doesn't seem to have made the cut, there's an incredible fauna to be had there as well anyway...nice microvertebrates to boot. I've spotted a link directing me to a paper on Marshosaurus from Dinosaur National Monument (that's just filler) rather than plain old Cleveland-Lloyd but anyway, Morrison biostratigraphy is in short, hell. Just hell. Setting one's stories in just one quarry is the best bet methinks. 
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
hmmm yeah, that would make sense.

I may have to admit I picked random fauna....
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:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Edited Feb 26, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Read up on Morrison biostratigraphy. I can direct you to this one for starters, but it just gets more confusing as you keep going. Sure, preservational bias (or simple rarity of the genus) may account for why some are so widespread and some aren't but I guess in terms of figuring out what should go with whom, it's a start I suppose. For one, the Brachiosaurus sp is the Potter Creek specimen, no? 
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2016
On Harpactognathus:

Many people have said that scaphognathines are considered by Mark Witton to have been corvid analogies, but let's not forget corvids (especially ravens) are surprisingly effective predators of tetrapods:
youtu.be/NA9ur-b-PvE
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:iconjonagold2000:
JonaGold2000 Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
fuck it
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2016
Could Allosaurus really get larger than 8,5 meters?
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes, there is a specimen of A.fragilis over 9.7 meters in length. Some also believe that Saurophaganax/Epanterias are adult Allosaurus, making its total length over 11 meters.
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:icondinosaurzzz:
Dinosaurzzz Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2016
Cool, it makes sense that the two you mentioned are adults
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:iconsnugglesthedinosaur:
snugglesthedinosaur Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
Would crushing multiple Allosaurus during an attack count as brontosmahing? (that's also in my episode)
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, #BRONTOSMASH is the neck smashing, so if it's that it qualifies.
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:iconsnugglesthedinosaur:
snugglesthedinosaur Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
yuy
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:iconjurassiczilla:
Jurassiczilla Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Student Artist
Aww no Ceratosaurus? I still love it anyways!
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks!
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:iconspinosaurus14:
Spinosaurus14 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016
I know this has nothing to do with WWD but, is breviparopus still a thing?
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It is a thing: a footprint. Not one 115 cm across though, but 90 or so.
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:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Sounds like an awesome episode again!
Which of the two giants is the heaviest actually? Supersaurus or the Brachiosaurus?
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks! :D

And Brachiosaurus sp. wins by a landslide; Supersaurus weighs around 41 tonnes, which is around the same as the subadult holotype of B.altithorax. B.sp tops 70.
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:iconfranoys:
Franoys Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2016
70!!!! xDDDDD Brachiosaurus biggest dinosaur again confirmed.
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
xDDDD

Well according to SVPOW pneumaticity increases as the animal grows (did they say that? I think they did, it does make sense). So perhaps 70 tonnes is an overestimate.
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2016
Larger animals actually seem to have proportionally less air inside than smaller ones. :iconfranoys: there can tell you more.
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Franoys compared small birds to large mammals and crocodiles, but the higher pneumaticity of birds is more associated to their pneumatic bones and air sacs, which mammals lack.
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:iconfranoys:
Franoys Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2016
Broly is right on what he says. Even within birds which do indeed show a high pneumatization, specially flying birds, the larger ones show a much smaller respiratory system when compared to the body volume " The total capacity of the respiratory system of an adult ostrich, which masses at about 100 kgs, would be 13,5% of the total body volume of the animal (Schmidt- Nielsen et al. 1969). This propierty is comparable to that of other terrestial mammals" 

This is also the reason why flying birds trend to stay smaller in size than the terrestrial ones. Anyway and citing my own writing, "the
 reduction of the lung capacity the bigger the animal gets is common in every single animal, making it an allometry relationship that unites every live being under a single law (with possible deviations from the regression equation of course). The smaller actual cetaceans, porpoises, mass out at similar values as humans do, and their lung capacity is 8% of the total body volume, the same as ours. Contrarily, blue whales show a lung capacity of 1,6-2,5% of the total body volume."

However the SPOW analysis could have probably been misscited and they perhaps talked about how bigger Sauropods could have had bigger adaptations towrds pneumatization on the post cranial skeleton to counter this effect as much as possible, however it would be opposed to what allometry laws show.

This is the writing if anyone is interested: drive.google.com/open?id=0B-K0…

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:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wow, that's more than I had guessed... Didn't know those guys came so close to titanosaurs when it comes to weight.
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:iconqueenserenity2012:
QueenSerenity2012 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016
You should throw Ornitholestes, Coelurus, or Tanycolagreus in here too as another background species. Preferably one of the latter two. They're very underappreciated.

Fantastic work, nonetheless. I never get sick of these updated WWD projects.
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:iconsnugglesthedinosaur:
snugglesthedinosaur Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
Or stokesosaurus
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:iconqueenserenity2012:
QueenSerenity2012 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016
Another good choice!
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:iconsnugglesthedinosaur:
snugglesthedinosaur Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
Also my episode is set in a floodplain surrounded by desert and there's no Hapactrognathus. However, in both of our episodes, a pack of Allosaurs being down a sickly Brontosaur and Torvosaurus is the top predator.
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
My fav episode evaaar if it was like this.
Especially because of Torvosaurus:D (Big Grin) 

Good work on the chart and the episode.
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you! :D (Big Grin) 
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:iconsnugglesthedinosaur:
snugglesthedinosaur Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
Lol my allosaurus just take out the torvosaur when it tries to steal their kill
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
RIP 10m long old elderly torvo
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:iconsnugglesthedinosaur:
snugglesthedinosaur Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
For sure, I bet a younger more aggressive individual would manage to get his point across quicker
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I believe it also helps that the Torvo in my episode is 64% bigger than in yours. lel
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:iconsnugglesthedinosaur:
snugglesthedinosaur Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
h3h
Reply
:iconspinosaurus14:
Spinosaurus14 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016
All lies! Stegafauruf was 9 m long, and saulowaganax was 13m long!!! Bigger than torwosaurf!!!
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016
Saurophaganax (or A. Maximus or mature adult A. fragilis) isn't even in this episode ....
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:iconspinosaurus14:
Spinosaurus14 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016
It doesn't matter at all!
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Anf Brontosaurus doesn't ezist, it if fake Apatofaurus!! get with the science!1!
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:iconbh1324:
bh1324 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016
Amazing line up.

Don't even care that it's missing my 2nd favourite Morrison formation Dinosaur.
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you!
Reply
:iconmistercoelurosaur:
Mistercoelurosaur Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2016
All of my yes's for this one
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
XD Thank you
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:iconrizkiusmaulanae:
RizkiusMaulanae Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
What does Sp. stand for ? Specimen ?
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Sp is species affinis. Brachiosaurus sp. means it's a close relative to Brachiosaurus altithorax but not identhical to it, and is most likely an unnamed new species.
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:iconrizkiusmaulanae:
RizkiusMaulanae Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
Ah okay
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:iconspinosaurus14:
Spinosaurus14 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016
Shut uP
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:iconrizkiusmaulanae:
RizkiusMaulanae Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
That doesn't funny to me
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:iconspinosaurus14:
Spinosaurus14 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016
At least I tried...
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:iconrizkiusmaulanae:
RizkiusMaulanae Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
okay
Reply
:iconkirkseven:
kirkseven Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2016
GSP skeletal's are okay but why didn't you use Scott Hartman's instead?
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