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This is probably gonna get debunked in like 5 minutes, but here's something... a fella on Discord? (darn you sss!) linked me to.
svpca.org/years/2016_liverpool…

Relevant quote:
''HOW BIG DID BAROSAURUS GET?
Mike Taylor1 and Matt Wedel2 1 -
University of Bristol 2 -
Western University of Health Sciences
The diplodocid sauropod Barosaurus is best known from the spectacular mounted skeleton in the atrium of the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). Apart from the disproportionately long neck it is similar in size to Diplodocus — but did Barosaurus get bigger? BYU field jacket 3GR was collected from the Jensen/Jensen quarry, Utah, in 1966 but only recently prepared. It contains three cervical vertebrae, designated A, B and C, anterior to posterior. They belong to Barosaurus based on elongation, broad prezygapophyseal facets, “hinged” prezygapophyseal rami with dorsomedial and dorsolateral faces, narrow, posteriorly set diapophyses bearing posterior tubercles, and wing-like postzygadiapophyseal laminae. Based on spine bifurcation, vertebra C is C9—C11. The centra of the AMNH cervicals C9—11 are 685, 737 and 775 mm long. That of vertebra C measures 1220 mm, making it 1.57—1.78 times longer. This suggests a neck length of 13.3—15.1 m based on 8.5 m for the AMNH specimen. 
BYU 9024 is an even larger cervical vertebra, referred to Supersaurus but indistinguishable from C9 of Barosaurus based on the characters above. At 1370 mm in total length, it is exactly twice the length of the AMNH C9, suggesting a neck 17 m long. Dystylosaurus has also been referred to Supersaurus. Although the holotype and only vertebra is clearly a diplodocid anterior dorsal (it has dual centroprezygapophyseal laminae, a large cotyle and “drooping” parapophyses), its tall, unsplit neural spine and pronounced ventral keel prevent assignment to any known diplodocid. It may be a valid, distinct genus. ''

Uh.

''BYU 9024 is an even larger cervical vertebra, referred to Supersaurus but indistinguishable from C9 of Barosaurus based on the characters above. At 1370 mm in total length, it is exactly twice the length of the AMNH C9, suggesting a neck 17 m long.''

...

So there you have it folks, a 17 meter neck. The fully grown animal was probably over 42 meters long and >65 tonnes.

Baro boi.

You wot.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconraishinl:
RaishinL Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
how trustworthy is this?
Reply
:iconmichaelptaylor:
MichaelPTaylor Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2016
Lead author here. You can trust the finding. I am basically 100% certain that the "Supersaurus" vertebra is Barosaurus. The only element of uncertainty here is its serial position, which is harder to be certain about. But it's not far off C9, where we assigned it.
Reply
:iconraishinl:
RaishinL Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
kay
Reply
:icontheropod1:
theropod1 Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
Pretty thrustworthy, not just for an abstract. That vertebra is definitely huge, there are enough pictures of it–it’s actually fairly well-known at least through appearances on SVPOW, and I’d definitely trust Taylor and Wedel to be able to take a measurement accurately. Their case for its assignment to Barosaurus was also pretty convincing, it’s based on an extensive combination of characters that are typical for the genus, and remember, vertebrae are actually very diagnostic elements for sauropods, offering lots of phylogenetically useful traits. So unless that animal somehow had one vertebra very weirdly outsized compared to the rest, it’s neck really must have been gigantic.
Reply
:iconraishinl:
RaishinL Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
ok, thanks for telling.
Reply
:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'd describe it as ''better than nothing but can still get debunked''
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That's... almost as long as your average public swimming pool...
Reply
:iconraishinl:
RaishinL Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
how do you know how long is your average public swimming pool?
Reply
:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Those that I know of in the neighboorhoods here are 20 to 25 meters. One is less than 20.
Reply
:iconraishinl:
RaishinL Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
kay
Reply
:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016
Nice, gonna check out those SVPCA 2016 abstracts.
Reply
:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016
WAT
Reply
:iconvasix:
vasix Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
WHAAAAT..????????
Reply
:iconbricksmashtv:
bricksmashtv Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I know Barosaurus is the highlight here, but woo! Dystylosaurus hype!
Reply
:icontheropod1:
theropod1 Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
About that Spinosaurus model, note that he assumed airspace volumes based on an avian regression equation for both of the theropods, and he assumed a Uniform tissue density apart from that (i.e. he didn't account for Spinosaurus' denser bones compared to T.rex's hollow ones, although as he mentioned the impact won't be great). So I think how Spinosaurus would float compared to T.rex needs further work. But this definitely casts severe doubt on Ibrahim et al.'s restored COM Position. That T. rex would be unsinkable is obvious. I'm not yet fully convinced Spinosaurus would be too. But adding this to plausible adjustments of body posture (what Cau proposed), it seems Spinosaurus was fully bipedal.

Btw Henderson estimated the Spinosaurus model at 6.4t, so we've now got somewhat of an official figure (note though that he modelled the dorsum as a thin sail throughout, and perhaps the density could be somewhat increased with the reduced pneumaticity considered, probably more of a lower estimated, but at least it's something).
Reply
:iconbricksmashtv:
bricksmashtv Featured By Owner Aug 26, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
hmm interesting. As for the short limbs, I'm inclined to agree with Ibrahim's restoration (read his reply to Hartman on his blog for my reasoning here), though we need far more evidence for the quadrupedality.
Reply
:icontheropod1:
theropod1 Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
The short limbs are an entirely different thing, Henderson’s work didn’t call those into question (at best he hinted that the restoration is not set in stone, but others have gone far further than that, e.g. Evers et al. 2016).
I’m undecided about those at the moment, however short legs or not, I think there are solid grounds to consider Spinosaurus a biped. According to Henderson it would appear likely that Ibrahim et al.’s "centre of mass" is just the geometric centroid of the model, without taking into account any internal air-filled structures or differing bone densities in the different body parts. This is obviously bound to shift the COM too far towards the front, since the anterior body regions of pretty much all theropods are the ones with the most airspace and the lowest density.

In the end, I think it was naive to think that the description of the new Spinosaurus material would settle more controversies than it caused lol
Reply
:iconbricksmashtv:
bricksmashtv Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
lol of course it was gonna cause some more controversies. It forever changed the perception of what is considered among the most popular and well known Dinosaurs out there.
Reply
:icontheropod1:
theropod1 Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
Yeah, well in certain circles there was a sort of "the new super-complete material will settle all our controversies"-attitude, but then it turned out the new, super-complete material wasn’t actually that complete, and what there was, while very interesting, was and is itself subject to a lot of interpretation. That’s what I mean. Not that it shouldn’t have been expected, which it should, just that some people, myself included, had some pretty unrealistic expectations as is sometimes the case when upcoming research is being constantly alluded to years in advance but without much detail.
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:iconbricksmashtv:
bricksmashtv Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Of course, that's why we must always display caution when discussing new specimens based only on abstracts and conference presentations in SVPCA lists years before the specimens are ever published on (;) (Wink) ).
Reply
:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Edited Aug 24, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Further reason to hope this doesn't get debunked quickly. :P

A further abstract in the same thing also confirms Spinosaurus was a competent terrrstrial locomotor, even in Ibrahim et al.'s model.
Reply
:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016
...

That makes even less sense than it being a quadruped.
Reply
:iconspinoinwonderland:
SpinoInWonderland Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016
That's what you say when you're proven wrong =P (Razz) 
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Being quadrupedal makes zero sense and has zero support, while this makes a little sense and has some support. 
Reply
:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016
Found this...

TESTING THE BUOYANCY OF AN IMMERSED SPINOSAURUS (DINOSAURIA: THEROPODA) WITH A DIGITAL MODEL  
Donald Henderson  
Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology        A recent interpretation of the fossil remains of the enigmatic, large predatory dinosaur Spinosaurus aegyptiacus proposed that it was specially adapted for an aquatic mode of life — a first for any predatory dinosaur. A detailed, three-dimensional, digital model of the animal was generated and the flotation potential of the model was tested using specially written software. It was found that Spinosaurus would have been able to float with its head clear of the water surface. However, a similarly detailed model of Tyrannosaurus rex was also able to float in a position enabling the animal to breathe freely, showing that there is nothing exceptional about a floating Spinosaurus. The software also showed that the centre of mass of Spinosaurus was much closer to the hips than previously estimated, implying that this dinosaur would still have been a competent walker on land. With regional body densities accounting for pneumatized skeletons and system of air sacs (modelled after birds), both the Spinosaurus and Tyrannosaurus models were found to be unsinkable, even with the air sacs substantially deflated. The conclusion is that Spinosaurus would still have been a competent terrestrial animal.      

Oh boy, who knew that Tyrannosaurus was able to swim; so hardcore...
Reply
:icontheropod1:
theropod1 Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
I hope that’s being ironic lol
Obviously everything with a density as low as T. rex would have severe difficulty not swimming. The point Henderson made is simple; almost all animals can swim, it should come as no surprise that theropods could too.
Reply
:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016
Wait, my response to the essay?

It was sarcastic.
Reply
:icontheropod1:
theropod1 Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
Ah good. Just wanted to make sure.
Reply
:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016
Heh.
Reply
:iconbricksmashtv:
bricksmashtv Featured By Owner Edited Aug 24, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
First Brontosaurus, now Dystylosaurus. What's next? Seismosaurus (I hope ;) (Wink) ). 

I must've missed that one. Y'know, cause focused on the Sauropods and whatnot. There was another one in there about Titanosauriformes and the "Damparis Sauropod" (AKA "French Bothriospondylus").
Reply
:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016
So much for not being able to go on land...

I was under impression that the no-legs theory may be right due to finding out that Ambulocetus couldn't go on land, but I'm happy to see that I got proved wrong!
Reply
:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
"Ambulocetus couldn't go on land"

The walking whale.

Can't walk.

mind = stepped on by sauropod
Reply
:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016
Yeah.

A skeletal study was done on Ambulocetus, Desmostylus, Paleoparadoxia, and Neoparadoxia; the result was that Ambulocetus, Paleoparadoxia, and Neoparadoxia couldn't go on land, while Desmostylus's lifestyle remained unknown.
Reply
:iconsir-giga:
Sir-Giga Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Discord? What Discord, can i have the link to the server?
Reply
:icontrilobitecannibal:
TrilobiteCannibal Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
that's like the length of a blue whale (not new but still mind blowing for me)
Reply
:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The largest blue whale was 29.9 meters, this is 10+ meters longer than a blue whale :P
Reply
:icontrilobitecannibal:
TrilobiteCannibal Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Mindblowing MIND BLOWN wOT Bill Cipher = Illuminati mind blown Michael Rosen Mind Blown Mind blown mind = BLOWN 
Reply
:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
XD mind = stepped on by a sauropod
Reply
:iconevodolka:
Evodolka Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
wow thats a pretty big size change :D
Reply
:iconbricksmashtv:
bricksmashtv Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Barosaurus is like Diplodocus (excluding Seismosaurus of course, because that's the best name ever), except infinitely cooler, for every reason possible. Also, now Barosaurus makes everyone else look lame except the OMNH Apatosaurus ajax specimens.
Reply
:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
XD, precisely. Both it and A.ajax are heavily under-represented for giant Morrison sauropods. A long-lost vertebra is more famous than they are...
Reply
:iconbricksmashtv:
bricksmashtv Featured By Owner Edited Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah. Than again A. fragillimus has been around far longer than either of these are. Granted the OMNH Apatosaurus has been around for 3 years. The problem me-thinks is that people always talk about A. fragillimus, but the OMNH specimens and the Superbarosaurus are pretty much unknown outside of Paleo circles.
Reply
:iconceratopsia:
Ceratopsia Featured By Owner Edited Aug 23, 2016  Student General Artist
I always knew it was large. I've always loved Baro.
Reply
:iconraishinl:
RaishinL Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
So B.lentus got THAT big?
Reply
:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
maybe a little bit smaller (Sauropod necks get proportionally longer as they age IIRC) but it is probably the longest sauropod barring Amphicoelias and ichnotaxon, yes.
Reply
:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016
That's huge.
Reply
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